From: WW2 History Club
Sent: Wednesday, May 26, 2010 18:36
To: WW2 History Club
Subject: WW2 History Club ... The most amazing airplane in History....For the Airplane Buffs

 

Thanks for club member Alan Myrden for this item

 

The pictures and text below describe a truly amazing airplane.  Actually, it is a bit too fantastic to be real.  Although the text claims that it is, if you look closely, you will see that the pictures are computer generated.  Based on what I was able to find out about this, Konstantin Kalinin was a Russian aircraft designer from the 1920s/1930s and his team did design some very large aircraft.  The K7 was a bit larger than the B52 and it is the K7 that was actually built and tested.  It had many structural and aerodynamic problems that were never solved.  It was the K7 that crashed and killed 15 people.  The pictures immediately below are from a proposed design from that team (?), i.e., what might be if all the structural, material and aerodynamic problems could have been worked out.  The pictures are computer generated renditions of what the plane would have looked like.  I could not find any data to confirm that the plane was ever actually built or even prototyped.  Based on materials and engines available in the 1930s, it is not a viable design and it is not clear what the intended purpose might be.  With a fixed undercarriage and “barn door” aerodynamics, even if it could get off the ground, it would be hard pressed to exceed 100 mph.  The recoil from the cannons would likely rip the airframe apart.  The engines appear to be water cooled and would, thus, be easy prey for fighter attacks.  But it is a great looking thing! 

 

At the far bottom of the email is a picture showing an actual K7 and crew.  It suggests a quite large aircraft but nothing like the thousand foot wingspan monster indicated in the original email.  K7 specs are also provided.

 


From: Allan & Carol
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 18:58
To: Mark Edrich
Subject: Fw: The most amazing airplane in History....For the Airplane Buffs

 

This is some plane. Enjoy  Allan

 

From:

Sent: Monday, May 03, 2010 10:26 PM

To:

Subject: FW: The most amazing airplane in History....For the Airplane Buffs

 

 

 

Subject: The most amazing airplane in History....For the Airplane Buffs

 

 


The most amazing airplane in History....For the Airplane Buffs


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Built in Russia during the 1930s, it flew 11 times before crashing and killing 15 people.


The designer,  Konstantin Kalinin, wanted to build two more planes but the project was scrapped.


Later, Stalin had Kalinin executed.


Evidently, it was not  good to fail on an expensive project under Stalin .


It's got propellers on the back of the wings, too. You can count 12 engines facing front.


The size  would be equivalent to the Empire State Building on  its side, with  cannons.


And you think the 747 was big... not only a bunch of engines but check out the cannons the thing was carrying.


In the 1930s the Russian army was obsessed by the idea of creating huge planes.


At that time they were proposed to have as many propellers as possible to help carrying those huge flying fortresses into the air, jet propulsion has not been implemented yet.


Not many photos were saved from those times because of the high secrecy levels of such projects and because a lot of time has already passed.


Still, on the attached photos you can see  one such plane - a heavy bomber K-7.

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Can you imagine what it would be like sitting in this thing when those cannons go off?


Looks like something out of a Jules Verne novel.

 

 

Picture showing the actual K-7

 

K7 Specification

 

 

 CREW

12

 PASSENGERS

128

 ENGINE

7 x M34F, 550kW

 WEIGHTS

    Take-off weight

38000 kg

83776 lb

    Empty weight

24400 kg

53793 lb

 DIMENSIONS

    Wingspan

53.0 m

174 ft 11 in

    Length

28.0 m

92 ft 10 in

    Wing area

454.0 m2

4886.81 sq ft

 PERFORMANCE

    Max. speed

234 km/h

145 mph

    Cruise speed

180 km/h

112 mph

    Ceiling

4000 m

13100 ft

    Range

3030 km

1883 miles